Today I’m back to my ongoing project of ranking horror franchises, sub-genres and directors. I’m exhausted with the news and have nothing of worth to say about it today. I’m also taking a quick break on heavier writing I’m doing professionally and creatively so it seemed like a perfect time to hack out the next list in this series. Today’s topic–the “Halloween” franchise. If you’d like to read my “Nightmare on Elm Street” or “Friday the 13th” lists please do so by clicking the embedded hyperlinks.

Today’s list will rank every “Halloween” movie—that’s right, both timelines of the original franchise (Halloween-Halloween II-H20-HResurection as well as Halloween-HII, H4, H5, H6) as well as the remakes and the standalone “Season of the Witch”. So both versions of Michael–the Shape and the overgrown redneck! Here we go!

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10. Halloween: Resurrection

To be honest, I couldn’t bring myself to slog through the Big Brother meets Scream via who knows what crap fest of Resurrection. Most Halloween fans pretend this one didn’t happen. It does feature kung-fu fighting between Bustah Rhymes and Michael Myers if that sounds appealing to you.

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9. Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers

What a crap-fest. What makes it a crap fest is it’s “throw everything at the wall and see what sticks” approach. This film undoes everything that was worthwhile in its predecessor and sets up an absurd side-plot that overtakes the film, ends it, and is never followed up on in successors. It’s disjointed, confusing, boring, repetitive…It may be the worst installment of any 1980s horror franchise and if you watch behind the scenes features on it you’ll hear the obvious confirmed in that it was just an attempt to quickly cash in on the unexpected financial success of its predecessor.

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8. Halloween II (2009)

Maybe Zombie’s worst film, definitely his most boring. Largely forgettable.

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7. Halloween (6): The Curse of Michael Myers

Most fans hate the thorn cult aspect of “Curse”, the 6th installment of the original franchise. I actually like it though I find its details and much of its execution lacking. I have no problem with an occult grounding for the Shape but this is the only film that tries to do it so it involved a fair amount of retconning. There are some genuinely creepy moments, it’s well shot and well acted, and I particularly liked the introduction of Tommy Doyle as an adult (Paul Rudd in his film debut) nemesis to the Shape. However as it is, nothing in 6 is grounded to what came before or followed up with in what came after so it stands as its own island (or hiccup).  Still, this is the first entertaining film mentioned thus far in the rankings so everything gets better from here onward!

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6. Halloween H20: 20 Years Later

“Scream”, “I Know What You Did Last Summer” and a slew of other 90s bubblegum horror flicks ushered in a very lucrative, commercial, and ultimately forgettable era of mainstream teen horror films. What made “Scream” terrific wasn’t ported over to H20 but what every other knock-off at the time did pretty much was. However, H20 was solid and enjoyable with a fresh-faced popular cast. H20 completely jettisons the “Halloween” timeline by pretending installments 4-6 never happened. Thus it follows as a direct sequel to II albeit “20 years later”. It’s worth it for the Laurie Strode-Michael Myers stand off though and it put the exclamation mark on this particular timeline of the series.

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5. Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers

This is peak-’80s horror franchise film-making. The censors were watching so you have a rather bloodless affair that is shot a bit glammier and acted passably but clearly aimed at the mall crowd. However, “Return” is enjoyable and seemed on the verge of actually surprising and prepped to give an exciting new direction to the series with the narrative (and twist) on Myers’ niece Jamie. However, everything that could have been great about 4 for the franchise was quickly undone in a truly atrocious follow-up.

Hremake

4. Halloween (2007)

Here’s another one many didn’t like—but I actually really enjoy Rob Zombie’s re-interpretation of “Halloween”. I think Zombie is a creative (if often derivative) director who has made some terrifying work. “Halloween” (2007) is second only to “The Devil’s Rejects” in his cannon. Many fans of the original series disliked this version because it explained too much—we get a grounding in “reality” for everything that was left mysterious in the first film. We get psychological exploration of Michael Myers, an origin story and an extensive background that “humanizes” the Shape. However, if it had been a shot for shot remake (e.g. the “Psycho” remake) it would have been pointless. Instead we get an original film that is disturbing, fast-paced, scary, and visually stunning.

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3. Halloween II (1981)

Taking place in the immediate wake of the first film (the same night!), Halloween II upped the body count and gore and followed through the Myers-Strode storyline for the night “he came back” to it’s culmination. Everything that worked in part one works in part two and though it’s not as original the second time around it does serve as a satisfying horror film and is worth a double-feature most Halloweens.

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2. Halloween III: Season of the Witch

A lot of people initially didn’t care for the third installment of Halloween—and many probably still don’t. “Season of the Witch” isn’t a Michael Myers film at all despite bearing the franchise moniker. After all had (thought to have) been said on Myers as a character by the end of the second film the idea was to use the franchise banner to present a new tale of terror each year in an annual anthology. “Season of the Witch” was the one and only such installment before the hard detour back to Michael in the following installment. However, just judging films by their own merits there’s no denying the quality of this one. This tale of technology, Halloween (the holiday) and “haunted” masks is a winner. It’s the best film in the series after the first. The soundtrack is great, the setting is creative, the story is cool. It’s an under-rated ’80s horror classic with a genuinely creepy ending.

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1. Halloween (1978)

John Carpenter’s original “Halloween” is one of the greatest horror films of all time and set the template for every American slasher film that would follow. Carpenter makes unique movies that evoke a definite style and feel that is wholly his own—yes “Halloween” borrowed from predecessors especially Italian horror films but what makes it his own is the soundtrack he composed and the vision he provides with every camera choice he makes. He also got a terrific cast for this film. This movie was terrifying for what it didn’t show as much as it was for what it did show and even more for what it did not explain (or need to). If you came to Halloween late after years of more gorier derivative fair it likely didn’t have the impact on you that it did for previous generations. It also is certainly not without fault—Loomis’ doomy declarations of danger are certainly hokey if you don’t give yourself over to the film and appreciate the greatness of Donald Pleasance. But if you’re a fan of horror this one is a must-see at least once a year and it retains a sense of fright, fun, excitement and nostalgia (it was nostalgic even when it first came out in the purposeful tranquility and design of the town’s sidewalks and atmosphere) that are unmatched elsewhere.

 

 

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It took two days for the President to denounce white supremacists after initially condemning the “hatred on many sides”. I am sure he ultimately caved in and named the main culprits after much pressure. But that “on many sides” aside is what stuck with most and is embedded in the interpretations far too many have of Saturday’s tragedy.

In an unsurprising continuation of willful ignorance and warped propaganda that passes as “fact”, a lot of white folks out there today judge what happened Saturday as a violent confrontation between two equally bad groups. I’ve seen far too much castigation of those who stood against the Nazis and even something akin to sympathy for the nazis themselves. For many conservative people today what happened Saturday was that “terrorist” Black Lives Matter protestors instigated violence during what would have otherwise been a “peaceful” demonstration by a perhaps fringe deluded extremist group.

When Trump refused to lay the blame on American neo-nazis, the alt-right and all other cults of racists that turned out in a march for white supremacy in Charlottesville on Saturday he made a dangerous, demeaning but much-desired (by his base) false equivalency. David Duke told Trump to remember what put him in the White House and Duke, former Klan “Grand” Wizard was certainly in attendance in Charlottesville.

This isn’t to say that there wasn’t blame for the violence on parties other than the white power cretins. The BBC is one of the few sources to instantly get the big picture and you can read their report here if you so desire. The blame is first and foremost on the Nazis but of course antifa should bear some fault as well—and it seems that Saturday was the largest exposure those folks have gotten in the mainstream in a long time. Antifa, if you aren’t aware (short for “antifascist”) have a complex history going back to Germany but the modern US branch of antifa is mainly known for showing up looking for violence anywhere far-right ideology is (or is perceived) to be present. In the past that has led to bomb threats, tear gas hurling and fists to the head at not only right-wing events but also concerts, movies, and bars when a member of antifa believes an artist, event or crowd consists of at least one “fascist” (labeled so by the antifa). So in addition to occasionally getting that wrong and performing terrorist acts on peaceful folks even when they get their target right (as on Saturday) they come ready to hurt as many of the other side as they physically can. As a friend of mine said, while punching a nazi may feel cathartic for you (and those pressing the replay button on youtube) it likely doesn’t accomplish the goals you want it to.

As the BBC (and other reputable sources) reported, the initial counter-protestors consisted of Black Lives Matter activists, pastors, clergy and church-goers, and UVA students, all of whom peacefully protested the white nationalists storming through campus with torches shouting garbage and attempting intimidation. Soon, however, the counter-protestors were infiltrated and inundated with antifa members ready for a fight. Everything then quickly escalated.

So today, the common conservative takeway is that “BLM are terrorists!” equally bad to the KKK. This is a dangerous and delusional interpretation but if we allow BLM (and the mainline churches and student activists) to be conflated with antifa in the coverage of Saturday’s tragedy we will allow not only damage to groups like BLM themselves but to also their very important, urgent cause.

Trump’s base—even those not consciously and purposefully racist—want to believe BLM is a terrorist group and that both sides are “equally bad.” They don’t want to question the role “Make America Great Again” and their support of Trump played in fomenting and recruiting more openly right-wing supremacists than ever before in recent history.

As I write this I just received a news alert that Trump has once again defended the rightwing protestors from Saturday (“not all of them were Nazis”). With Bannon in the White House and Trump’s base convinced the neo-nazis share nothing in common with their own political beliefs we have a long way to go in addressing this country’s race problems. Antifa isn’t helping, particularly as they go after the ACLU openly. We can’t allow the nazis to cause us to relinquish our own highest values and identities in our battle to discredit and overcome them otherwise they score a huge win in this war.